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Fully informed.

The Task Force on Infectious Disease Preparedness and Response is comprised of experts and professionals from highly respected Texas institutions. The task force exists to provide critical information and recommendations regarding the risks of infectious diseases to Texas citizens.

Stay Informed

Always prepared.

Understanding proper procedure and best practices can make all the difference in a variety of medical scenarios. To help protect you and the health of those around you, TexasIDR provides free training materials, online courses, opportunities to engage with the healthcare community, and free continuing education credits for medical professionals and first responders.

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OUR MISSION

A statewide work group of health professionals that will gather, review, and post educational resources for multiple audiences on preparedness and response to emerging and important infectious diseases, such as Ebola.

Courses

To help prevent the spread of infectious diseases, check out the informative and instructional courses available through TexasIDR. Courses are open and free to anybody and CE, CME, and CNE credit is offered upon completion of each module. Please click on the modules below to join the TXIDR community and get started.

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Featured Courses

New Antifungal Agents
This online enduring material will provide vital information on new antifungal agents and their toxicities and limitations as well as gaps in antifungal therapy which require new antifungal agents.
   36 minutes
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Infections Associated with the Use of Novel Cancer Therapies
This online enduring material will provide vital information on infections associated with the use of novel cancer therapies.
   37 minutes
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Top Stories
Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
Since 17 February 2020, no new cases have been reported in the ongoing Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. While this is a positive development, there is still a high risk of re-emergence of EVD given the current challenges related to limited resources amidst other local and global emergencies, continued insecurity and population displacement in previous hotspots, and limited access to some affected communities. It is therefore critical to maintain surveillance and response operations in the period leading up to the declaration of the end of the outbreak, as well as after the declaration – as outlined in the WHO recommended criteria for declaring the end of the EVD outbreak. Ongoing outbreak response efforts continue, which include investigating and validating new alert cases, supporting appropriate care and rapid diagnosis of suspected cases (which continue to be detected), supporting survivors through a multi-disciplinary programme, and strategically transitioning activities. From 24 to 31 March, an average of 4082 alerts were reported and investigated daily. Of these alerts, 274 were validated as suspected cases, requiring specialized care and laboratory testing to rule-out EVD. From 23 to 29 March, 2376 samples were tested including: 1322 blood samples from alive, suspected cases; 365 swabs from community deaths; and 689 samples from re-tested patients. Overall, laboratory activity decreased by 14% compared to the prior week.
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Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
No new cases have been reported in the ongoing Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 17 February 2020 (Figure 1).
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Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo
There have been no new cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reported in the ongoing outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 17 February 2020. However, because there is still a risk of re-emergence of EVD, it is critical to maintain surveillance and response operations until and after the end of outbreak declaration – as outlined in the WHO recommended criteria for declaring the end of the EVD outbreak. Unfortunately, the response faces increasing limitations that could result in delayed detection and control of flare-ups. These limitations include a funding shortfall, ongoing insecurity and lack of access to some areas, and limited staffing and resources amidst other local and global emergencies.
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